Skin Wrinkles

 

As a person ages, the skin undergoes significant changes:

  • The cells divide more slowly, and the inner layer of skin (the dermis) starts to thin. Fat cells beneath the dermis begin to atrophy (diminish). In addition, the ability of the skin to repair itself diminishes with age, so wounds are slower to heal. The thinning skin becomes vulnerable to injuries and damage.
  • The underlying network of elastin and collagen fibers, which provides scaffolding for the surface skin layers, loosens and unravels. Skin then loses its elasticity. When pressed, it no longer springs back to its initial position but instead sags and forms furrows.
  • The sweat- and oil-secreting glands atrophy, depriving the skin of their protective water-lipid emulsions. The skin's ability to retain moisture then diminishes and it becomes dry and scaly.
  • Frown lines (those between the eyebrows) and crow's feet (lines that radiate from the corners of the eyes) appear to develop because of permanent small muscle contractions. Habitual facial expressions also form characteristic lines.
  • Gravity exacerbates the situation, contributing to the formation of jowls and drooping eyelids. (Eyebrows, surprisingly, move up as a person ages, possibly because of forehead wrinkles.)
  • Wrinkles can have a profound impact on self-esteem. Indeed, the stigma attached to looking old is evidenced by the fact that Americans spend more than $12 billion each year on cosmetics to camouflage the signs of aging. Our current society places a premium on youthfulness, and age discrimination in the workplace, although illegal, has stalled many a person’s career. Indeed, the emotional ramifications of aging explain in large part why the cosmetics industry and plastic surgeons thrive.

Aging Process and Wrinkles: As a person ages, skin undergoes significant changes:

  • The cells divide more slowly, and the inner layer of skin (the dermis) starts to thin.
  • Fat cells beneath the dermis begin to atrophy (diminish).
  • The underlying network of elastin and collagen fibers, which provides scaffolding for the surface layers, loosens and unravels.
  • Skin loses its elasticity. When pressed, it no longer springs back to its initial position but instead sags and forms furrows.
  • The sweat- and oil-secreting glands atrophy, depriving the skin of their protective water-lipid emulsions. The skin's ability to retain moisture then diminishes and it becomes dry and scaly.
  • Frown lines (those between the eyebrows) and crow's feet (lines that radiate from the corners of the eyes) appear to develop because of permanent small muscle contractions. Habitual facial expressions also form characteristic lines.
  • Gravity exacerbates the situation, contributing to the formation of jowls and drooping eyelids. (Eyebrows, surprisingly, move up as a person ages, possibly because of forehead wrinkles.)
  • In addition, the ability of the skin to repair itself diminishes with age, so wounds are slower to heal.

Sun Damage (Photoaging) and Wrinkles:
The role of the sun cannot be overestimated as the most important cause of prematurely aging skin (called photoaging) and skin cancers. Overall, exposure to ultraviolet (referred to as UVA or UVB) radiation emanating from sunlight accounts for about 90% of the symptoms of premature skin aging, and most of these effects occur by age 20.

Processes Leading to Wrinkles. Even small amounts of UV radiation trigger the following process that negatively effects skin:
  • Sunlight damages collagen fibers (the major structural protein in the skin) and causes accumulation of abnormal elastin (the protein that causes tissue to stretch).
  • In response to this sun-induced elastin accumulation, large amounts of enzymes called metalloproteinases are produced. (One study indicated that when people with light to moderate skin color are exposed to sunlight for just five to 15 minutes, metalloproteinases remain elevated for about a week.)
  • The normal function of these metalloproteinases is generally positive, to remodel the sun-injured tissue by manufacturing and reforming collagen. (They may even have factors that protect against melanoma, although this is not clear.)
  • This is an imperfect process, however, and some of these enzymes actually degrade collagen. The result is an uneven formation ( matrix) of disorganized collagen fibers called solar scars .
  • Repetition of this imperfect skin rebuilding over and over again causes wrinkles.
  • UV radiation also promotes oxidation, the release of damaging and unstable oxygen-free radicals. Oxidation contributes to wrinkling, possibly by activating the metalloproteinases that degrade connective tissue.

Other Factors Responsible for Wrinkles

In addition to sunlight, other factors may hasten the formation of wrinkles:
  • Cigarette smoke produces oxygen-free radicals and is known to accelerate wrinkles and aging skin disorders. A 2001 study also found that smokers have considerably higher levels of metalloproteinases than non-smokers, which may help account for the skin-aging effects of smoking.
  • Air pollution. Ozone, a common air pollutant, may be a particular problem for the skin. One study reported that it might deplete the amount of vitamin E in the skin; this vitamin is an important anti oxidant.
  • Rapid weight loss can also cause wrinkles by reducing the volume of fat cells that cushion the face. This not only makes a person look gaunt, but can cause the skin to sag.

Skin Types:
Experts have devised a classification system for skin phototypes (SPTs) based on the sensitivity to sunlight. It ranges from SPT I (lightest skin plus other factors) to IV (darkest skin). [ See Table ] People with skin types I and II are at highest risk for photoaging skin diseases, including cancer. It should be noted, however, that premature aging from sunlight can affect people of all skin shades.


Eczema 

What’s the difference between eczema and atopic dermatitis?
Eczema is a general term encompassing various inflamed skin conditions. One of the most common forms of eczema is atopic dermatitis (or "atopic eczema"). Approximately 10 percent to 20 percent of the world population is affected by this chronic, relapsing, and very itchy rash at some point during childhood. Fortunately, many children with eczema find that the disease clears and often disappears with age.

In general, atopic dermatitis will come and go, often based on external factors. Although its cause is unknown, the condition appears to be an abnormal response of the body’s immune system. In people with eczema, the inflammatory response to irritating substances overacts, causing itching and scratching. Eczema is not contagious and, like many diseases, currently cannot be cured. However, for most patients the condition may be managed well with treatment and avoidance of triggers.

What does eczema look and feel like?
Although eczema may look different from person to person, it is most often characterized by dry, red, extremely itchy patches on the skin. Eczema is sometimes referred to as "the itch that rashes," since the itch, when scratched, results in the appearance of the rash.

Eczema can occur on just about any part of the body; however, in infants, eczema typically occurs on the forehead, cheeks, forearms, legs, scalp, and neck. In children and adults, eczema typically occurs on the face, neck, and the insides of the elbows, knees, and ankles. In some people, eczema may "bubble up" and ooze. In others, the condition may appear more scaly, dry, and red. Chronic scratching causes the skin to take on a leathery texture because the skin thickens (lichenification).

    

SkinPro TM
Supports Skin & Dermatological Function

SkinPro has been specially formulated to target the natural processes that lead to skin aging. This unique blend of antioxidants help support healthy, youthful looking skin from the inside. Leading dermatologists have identified a small number of natural antioxidants that, when taken orally as a dietary supplement, enhance the appearance of skin giving it a youthful supple look.

SkinPro may reduce skin inflammation, nourish and grow skin cells and collagen, increase skin elasticity & firmness, promote smoothness and rejuvenate your skin from the inside out. SkinPro may relieve eczema symptoms and cold sores rashes and pimples. Also, It may target age spots and reduce sebum, clear pores and get rid of acne bacteria

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Ingredients: Vitamin C (as Ascorbic acid), Vitamin E (dl- alpha-tocopheryl acetate) ,Mangosteen Extract (Garcinia mangostana), Acai Fruit Berry, Geranium (genus Geranium), Curcumin Extract (Curcuma longa), Evening Primrose Extract, Pteria Martensii (Pearl Powder), Grape skin extract, Seaweed Extract.

 

 

Serving Size 

 Price

SkinPro 

90 Capsules 

$39.95


 

 

 

 

 

 

Medical Disclaimer

The information and procedures contained herein is not presented as medical advice nor should it be used as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care practitioner. The information contained herein has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products and the information set forth herein are not designed to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease nor should any information contained herein be read as prescribing any specific remedy or guaranteeing any specific result. We are not responsible for any adverse effects or consequences resulting from the use of any of the suggestions preparations, or procedures discussed herein. All matters pertaining to your physical health should be supervised by a health care professional.